Royal watercolour society

DEFINITION

Descendant of the Society of Painters in Water Colours and for much of its organization the Royal Society of Painters in Water Colours, it is an English "institution of painters working in watercolors." It should not be confused with a separate organization, the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours (see Glossary). Founded in 1804 as the SPWC, which also was called the Old Water Color Society, its founding members had withdrawn from the Royal Academy because of feeling that water color was not given enough respect. Original Royal Watercolour Society members included William Sawrey, William Wells, John Varley, William Gilpin, Robert Hills, John Nattes, Samuel Shelley, Cornelius Varley, William Henry Pyne and Nicholas Pocock. From 1812 to 1820, the name was changed to The Society of Painters in Oil and Watercolours, but then reverted to the original name. In 1881, members obtained a Royal Charter as the Royal Society of Painters in Water Colours, and in 1988, the name was changed to the Royal Watercolour Society. Source: Wikipedia-Royal Watercolour Society.

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